Below are the different members of the LEF Committee, elected at the AGM. If you’d like to run for election to the committee, sign up to the mailing list (here) and keep an eye out for announcements about the committee positions.

 

Karin Tusting, Convenor

Senior Lecturer in Linguistics and Literacy Studies, Lancaster University, UK

k.tusting@lancaster.ac.uk

I am a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Linguistics and English Language, Lancaster University, and a member of the Lancaster Literacy Research Centre.  I teach on courses including research methods, discourse analysis, and language and identities.  My research is in the area of workplace literacies.  I am currently working on an ESRC research project exploring the range of academics’ writing in university workplaces, and I have previously researched bureaucracy in other educational workplaces, taking an ethnographic perspective on workplace paperwork.

I have been a member of LEF since its inception, when I was finishing my PhD looking at the role of literacies and texts in the construction of identity in a Catholic parish.  I was the first LEF communications secretary and helped to set up the BAAL Special Interest Group system.

 

Deborah Swinglehurst, Meetings Secretary

Senior Clinical Lecturer in the Global Health, Innovation and Policy Unit, Centre for Primary Care and PublicHealth, Blizard Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London

d.swinglehurst@qmul.ac.uk

I am an academic GP with over 20 years of clinical experience and a strong track record in teaching and research. My interest in linguistic ethnography began in 2008 when I attended one of the popular LEF courses – “Explorations in ethnography language and communication” and did an Open University Masters module in Discourse Analysis. My PhD (2012) was a linguistic ethnographic study of the electronic patient record in primary care, in which I studied how the electronic record contributes to shaping practice in this health setting. I have presented my work at numerous international conferences including EELC (2008, 2010, 2012, 2014); International Symposium of Sciolinguistics (2010); COMET (2009, 2010, 2011, 2012); BAAL (2011); EACH (2014),  and have published my work in several peer reviewed journals. I joined the LEF committee in 2012 as a co-opted member, and organised the annual e-seminar in 2014. My academic interest is in exploring complex social practices in primary health care delivery using ethnographic and linguistic ethnographic approaches. I am particularly interested in the relationship between policy and practice and in the interfaces between medicine, social science and linguistics. My research areas include clinician-patient interaction, the role of new technologies, and organisational routines around repeat prescribing and chronic disease management. My educational experience includes tutoring on a web-based MSc in International Primary Health Care (UCL), undergraduate teaching (UEA, QMUL) and facilitating numerous interdisciplinary workshops to health professionals. I run a seminar series on “Technology, Health and Society” at QMUL. I have published research in e-learning and was joint winner of the HEA/THES “e-tutor of the year” award in 2005. I am a member of the East Anglia Faculty Board for the RCGP and also the RCGP Fellowship Committee. Linguistic ethnography has much to offer in understanding the complexity of healthcare. I hope my experience in both worlds may help me to make progress in bringing linguistic ethnographic approaches to the attention of medical researchers and practitioners.

 

 

 

Robert Sharples, Treasurer

PhD candidate, School of Education, University of Leeds

ed12rs@leeds.ac.uk

Robert’s research investigates identity formation and affiliation among young multilingual pupils in the UK school system, focusing on the impact of the academies agenda.

 

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Jamie Murdoch, Membership Secretary

Researcher, School of Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK

jamie.murdoch@uea.ac.uk

I am a researcher in Health Services Research at the University of East Anglia. My interest in Linguistic Ethnography began during my PhD when I was studying how people with asthma talk about medicine-taking. I attended the course ‘Key Concepts and Methods in Ethnography, Language and Communication’, involving five days of training, data sessions and workshops. The course content had a huge impact on my interpretation of the research interviews I had collected and led to wider appreciation of contextual features shaping the talk of people with chronic illness. Working with colleagues in Bristol and Exeter, I have recently completed a study of how computer decision support software shapes nurse-patient communication during telephone triage interactions in which we conducted a multi-modal analysis of audio and video data. I’m particularly interested in using LE to study patient journeys and ‘text trajectories’ of medical records in different health care settings.

 

dave_sayers

Dave Sayers, Network Manager

Senior Lecturer, Dept Humanities, Sheffield Hallam University, UK; and Honorary Research Fellow, College of Arts & Humanities, Swansea University, UK

dave.sayers@cantab.net

At Sheffield Hallam, I teach various topics in linguistics and sociolinguistics. I also hold an Honorary Research Fellowship in the College of Arts and Humanities at Swansea University. My ORCID number is 0000-0003-1124-7132.

I gained my PhD in 2009 from the University of Essex (sponsored by the UK Economic and Social Research Council: award number PTA-030-2005-00968).

Elsewhere I sit on the UK Economic and Social Research Council’s Peer Review College. I’m the elected network manager of the Linguistic Ethnography Forum. I’m also an Associate Fellow of the UK Higher Education Academy, a registered Expert Adviser with the Welsh Government, and a member of the International Panel of Experts at the Kazakh National Centre of Science and Technology Evaluation.

As Network Manager of the Linguistic Ethnography Forum, the website is my responsibility, so you can report any problems (or lavish any praise) in my direction.

 

Johanna_Woydack

Johanna Woydack, Ordinary member of LEF committee

Postdoctoral Fellow at City University of Hong Kong, China

johanna.woydack@kcl.ac.uk

I completed my  Ph.D. at King’s College London, in the Centre for Language, Discourse and Communication.

My Ph.D. research was an ethnography of a multilingual London outbound call center. My main focus was on standardization and the production, uptake and use of scripts by the various participants. However, I also explored issues such as (transnational) migration, the role of gender, language learning in the workplace, workplace literacy and London’s language market. For this research, I was honored to receive a grant from the Graduate Funds for Women studies (FfWG) in 2011.

I have presented my research at conferences such as SS 19 and BAAL. I am a member of BAAL and AAA. Prior to my MSc, I studied in Germany, Ireland, France, the United States, Portugal and Italy.

 

Zoe Nikolaidou, Ordinary member of LEF committee

zoe.nikolaidou@sh.se

Senior Lecturer, School of Culture and Education, Södertörn University, Stockholm, Sweden